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William (Bud) Abbott and Lou Costello (born Louis Francis Cristillo) performed together as Abbott and Costello, an American comedy duo whose work in radio, film and television made them the most popular comedy team during the 1940s and 50s. Thanks to the endurance of their most popular and influential routine, "Who's on First?"
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Times Played: 1193   Released: 1945


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A husband and wife crime-fighting team based on the detective fiction books by Francis Crane. Starring Claudia Morgan and Les Damon as the husband and wife detective team, Jean and Pat Abbott. The show aired from 1945-1947.
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Times Played: 880   Released: 1954


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A radio show hosted by Abe Burrows.
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Times Played: 831   Released: 1947


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Academy Award Theater began its full 39 week season with a high note -- with Bette Davis in her Oscar winning role in Jezebel. By looking at the list of actors who appeared during the series, you can see that this series ranked up there with the Lux Radio Theater in its range of movies chosen to be dramatized as well as the actors involved. Gene Hersholt, veteran radio and movie star, spoke as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences during the first show welcoming the E.R. Squibb Co., giant pharmaceutical company as sponsor. These 30 minute programs consisted of dramatizations of movies whose pictures, players, techniques, and skills won or were nominated for the coveted golden Oscars.

The thirty nine episodes of this series aired between March 30, 1946 and December 18, 1946.
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Times Played: 874   Released: 1946


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The title of this series refers to the writer and director of the show, Carlton E. Morse. There were 52 episodes of this thirty-minute adventure series featuring a San Francisco detective, Captain Bart Friday, and his sidekick, Skip Turner. Captain Friday and Skip roamed the world together seeking danger and solving mysteries. The stories told bordered on the supernatural, though there was usually a rational explanation for the superbly written terror-chillers. 1944.
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Times Played: 739   Released: 1944


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These are the tales of the dramatic and entertaining accounts in the scientific research history. Written by Westinghouse physicist Dr. Phillips Thomas, to encourage a civic an interest in science.
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Times Played: 735   Released: 1946


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As the name suggests, it described different situations from his career.
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Times Played: 739   Released: 1934


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The Adventures of Dick Cole was a 1942 juvenile adventure radio series based on a comic book character published by Novelty Press, and later, Star Publications. Created in 1940 by cartoonist Bob Davis (The Chameleon), Dick Cole is a heroic cadet at the fictional Farr Military Academy. The character was introduced in the "Origin of Dick Cole," in the first issue of Novelty Press's Blue Bolt Comics (June 1940).
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Times Played: 1047   Released: 1942


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The Adventures of Frank Merriwell first ran on NBC radio from March 26 to June 22, 1934 as a 15-minute serial airing three times a week at 5:30pm. Sponsored by Dr. West's Toothpaste, this program starred Donald Briggs in the title role. Harlow Wilcox was the announcer.

After a 12-year gap, the series returned October 5, 1946 as a 30-minute Saturday morning show on NBC, continuing until June 4, 1949. Lawson Zerbe starred as Merriwell, Jean Gillespie and Elaine Rostas as Inza Burrage, Harold Studer as Bart Hodge and Patricia Hosley as Elsie Belwood. Announcers were Mel Brandt and Harlow Wilcox, and the Paul Taubman Orchestra supplied the background music.
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Times Played: 720   Released: 1936


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The Adventures of Frank Race was an American radio adventure serial syndicated by Bruce Eells Productions. The 30-minute program's first East Coast broadcast was 1949, and the show ran 43 episodes.

Frank Race mainly investigated international insurance scams around the globe in various exotic locations, making him something of a cross between James Bond and Johnny Dollar.
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Times Played: 922   Released: 1949


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Gregory Peck and Virginia Mayo recreated their roles on a one-hour Lux Radio Theater program broadcast on January 21, 1952.
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Times Played: 1032   Released: 1952


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The Adventures of Maisie (aka Maisie) was a radio comedy series starring Ann Sothern as underemployed entertainer Maisie Ravier, a spin-off of Sothern's successful 1939-1947 Maisie movie series. The series was heard on CBS Radio, NBC Radio, the Mutual Radio Network, and on Mutual flagship radio station WHN in NYC.
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Times Played: 804   Released: 1952


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Elements of mystery have always been represented in literature, but the detective story didn't arrive on the scene until the mid 1800's. Edgar Allan Poe's The Murders in the Rue Morgue, published in 1841, was the first. The Murder's main character, C. Auguste Dupin, was a brilliant detective who relied on superior deductive powers to solve the crime. He and his unnamed narrator companion solved this and two other mysteries.

Later in the 19th century Sir Arthur Conan Doyle expanded on Poe's new concept in his Sherlock Holmes stories. Many think that Doyle patterned Holmes and Watson after Dupin and his friend. The Sherlock Holmes stories were wildly popular in England, and after Conan Doyle, the British continued to dominate the detective genre with other detectives who depended on keen observation and deductive logic to solve crimes. These detectives most commonly applied their brilliance to crimes in quaint country houses outside small useridyllic villages.

Then, in the 1930's and 1940's American writers added a grittier urban element to the detective genre -- the hardboiled detective. As opposed to the typical British detective, the hardboiled detective was generally a cynical loner with a strong sense of justice that wasn't necessarily limited to that provided by the court system. Instead of country houses, these detectives were more likely to be found in shady all-night bars or on the mean streets of Los Angeles, Chicago, or New York City.

Dashiell Hammett introduced the new genre, and Sam Spade, in 1930 in his novel The Maltese Falcon. A few years later Raymond Chandler came along and perfected the type, with his detective, Philip Marlowe. Chandler introduced Marlowe in his first novel, The Big Sleep, and Philip Marlowe continued to solve crimes in six subsequent Chandler novels. Chandler had previously published a number of short stories featuring other detectives; however, Marlowe proved so popular that when the stories were later republished the author often switched the detectives to Philip Marlowe.

Marlowe was a more complex character than some of his hard boiled brethren. Sure he could handle a gun and take a beating. But, he was more than just a tough guy, he had gone to college, could play chess, and appreciated classical music. He also had his own strong ethical standards and turned down jobs that didn't measure up to those standards.
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Times Played: 687   Released: 1947


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Against the Storm is a radio daytime drama which had three separate runs over a 13-year period; the initial run was on the NBC Red Network from October 1939 to December 1942, with revivals of the series on the Mutual from August to October 1949 and ABC from October 1951 to June 1952. Created and written by Sandra Michael, the drama was the only daytime radio serial to ever win a Peabody Award, winning the award in 1942.
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Times Played: 680   Released: 1939


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The Air Adventures of Jimmie Allen was a radio adventure serial created by writers Bob Burtt and Bill Moore, both of whom were from Kansas City, Missouri. The 15-minute program was broadcast from 1933 until 1937.
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Times Played: 639   Released: 1933


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A radio variety show hosted by Al Jolson.
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Times Played: 775   Released: 1943


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The series began on NBC Radio as a summer replacement situation comedy in 1944, featuring vocalist Bea Wain. It then moved to ABC Radio with Jean Gillespie portraying Young's girlfriend Betty. The program was next broadcast by NBC for a 1946-47 run and was off in 1948. When it returned to NBC in 1949, Louise Erickson played Betty and Jim Backus was heard as snobbish playboy Hubert Updike III. Later, Alan Young went on to be Wilbur on the TV Show Mr. Ed.
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Times Played: 629   Released: 1944


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BBC radio comedy series, broadcast from 1971-72.

This is the radio version of the BBC television series "All Gas and Gaiters". The television scripts have been adapted for radio.

This is a situation comedy depicting the goings-on at a fictional English Cathedral called St Ogg's. The main characters are the Bishop and his chaplain. The latter, who is notionally the star of the show, is the Bishop's secretary; but the Bishop treats him as a general dogsbody. The other regular characters are the Archdeacon (who is also the Bishop's oldest friend), and the Dean (the Bishop's principal antagonist).
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Times Played: 1785   Released: 1966


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In the early 1930s Ed McConnell became a well known radio personality as 'The Aladdin Lamp Man' who sang songs, told stories and sold Aladdin lamps over the air.
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Times Played: 840   Released: 1930


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America
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Times Played: 947   Released: 1935


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The American Trails tells the story of the brave men and women who experienced a myriad of astounding triumphs of the human spirit.
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Times Played: 684   Released: 1953


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George Bernard Shaw once said,
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Times Played: 674   Released: 1948


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Ann of the Airlanes was a syndicated radio adventure drama series broadcast between 1932 and the 1950s.

The story focused on Ann Burton, an airplane hostess employed by Interstate Airlines. She also worked with the Secret Service, as did her romantic interest, pilot Jack Baker. Gerald Mohr portrayed Secret Service agent and co-pilot Art Morrison. Also in the cast was John Gibson who portrayed Pete.

There were more than a few radio aviation dramas during the 1930s, but this was the only one with a female lead.
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Times Played: 681   Released: 1932


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Arch Oboler's Plays was a radio anthology series written, produced and directed by Arch Oboler. Minus a sponsor, it ran for one year, airing Saturday evenings on NBC from March 25, 1939 to March 23, 1940 and revived five years later on Mutual for a sustaining summer run from April 5, 1945 to October 11, 1945.
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Times Played: 761   Released: 1939


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Radio Show based on the Archie Comics.

Archie Andrews began on the NBC Blue Network on May 31, 1943, switched to Mutual in 1944, and then continued on NBC from 1945 until September 5, 1953. The program's original announcer was Kenneth Banghart, later succeeded by Bob Shepard (during the 1947-48 season, when Swift and Company sponsored the program) and Dick Dudley. Archie was first played by Charles Mullen, Jack Grimes and Burt Boyar, with Bob Hastings as the title character during the NBC years. Jughead was portrayed by Hal Stone and Cameron Andrews. Stone later wrote about his radio career in his autobiography, Relax... Archie! Re-laxx! (Bygone Days Press, 2003). During the NBC run, Betty was portrayed by Rosemary Rice, and Veronica by Gloria Mann.
Rating: Not rated yet
Times Played: 785   Released: 1943


Personal Best: N/A

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